Sun Salutation Sequences A, B, and C: A Complete Guide (2023)

Table of Contents
What are Sun Salutations? How to do Sun Salutation A Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose) Utthita Hastasana in Tadasana (Arms Extended in Mountain Pose) Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend) Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend) Chaturanga Dandasana (Half-Plank Position) Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (Upward-Facing Dog) Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog) Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend) Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend) Utthita Hastasana in Tadasana (Arms Extended in Mountain Pose) Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose) How to do Sun Salutation B Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose) Utkatasana (Chair Pose) Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend) Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend) Chaturanga Dandasana (Half-Plank Position) Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (Upward-Facing Dog) Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog) Virabhadrasana 1 (Warrior 1), right side Chaturanga Dandasana (Half-Plank Position) Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (Upward-Facing Dog) Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog) Virabhadrasana 1 (Warrior 1), left side Chaturanga Dandasana (Half-Plank Position) Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (Upward-Facing Dog) Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog) Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend) Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend) Utkatasana (Chair Pose) Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose) How to do Sun Salutation C (as based on the Integral Yoga lineage) Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose) Utthita Hastasana in Tadasana (Arms Extended in Mountain Pose) Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend) Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend) Anjanayasana (Low Lunge Pose), right side Plank Pose to transition Knees-Chest-Chin to transition Bhujangasana (Cobra Pose) Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog) Anjanayasana (Low Lunge Pose), left side Plank Pose to transition Knees-Chest-Chin Bhujangasana (Cobra Pose) Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog) Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend) Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend) Utthita Hastasana in Tadasana (Arms Extended in Mountain Pose) Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose) What are the benefits of Sun Salutations? Sun Salutations improve mobility of your entire body Sun Salutations connect you to your breath Sun Salutations are ritualistic Sun Salutations offer cardiovascular benefits Sun Salutations are accessible Sun Salutations reduce stress When should you do Sun Salutations? Should you warm up before Sun Salutations? What’s the difference between Sun Salutations A, B, and C? When should you do each? Modifications for Sun Salutations Tips for Sun Salutations The bottom line FAQs Videos

Human beings have been saluting the sun for millennia. Many people consider the sun a source of life — especially those in agrarian cultures, who rely on crops and farming for sustenance and economy.

One of the very first yogic texts, the Vedas (which was said to be created around 1500–1200 B.C.) included many prayers and rituals that ancient yogis would offer to the sun every day.

In modern times, the practice of yoga has shifted to include more physical practices (asana), and the Sun Salutations (Surya Namaskara) are now practiced as a moving prayer in honor of this powerful star (Side note: Did you know the sun is a star? How cool is that?!) (1).

Sun Salutation Sequences A, B, and C: A Complete Guide (1)Share on Pinterest

Sun Salutations are often taught within movement-based yoga settings.

While their original intention may have been more ritualistic and prayer-based, these dynamic sequences became popular over time for their ability to both warm up the body quickly and move the body in many directions.

The series are traditionally breath-based, meaning that each movement happens on a portion of the breath. For this reason, some scholars and researchers have explored the cardiovascular benefits of the series (2).

The three best-known Sun Salutations are classified by the letters A, B, and C, although not all yoga lineages apply these labels to exactly the same sequences. See below for the full sequences.

Sun Salutation Sequences A, B, and C: A Complete Guide (2)Share on Pinterest

Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose)

Directions:

  1. Stand at the top of your mat with your arms by your sides. Your feet can be together or hip-width apart.
  2. Align your ankles, knees, and shoulders so your body is symmetrical.
  3. With your arms by your sides, turn your upper arm bones to face each other with your palms forward, opening your chest.
  4. Keep your chin parallel to the floor.

Utthita Hastasana in Tadasana (Arms Extended in Mountain Pose)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, reach your arms up and in line with your ears.
  2. Some lineages add a slight backbend at the top of this movement.

Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, bring your arms down, reaching wide, and fold forward at your hips.
  2. Place your hands by your feet or outer shins or on blocks.
  3. Hang your head freely.

Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, reach your chest forward and lift your torso halfway up, with a long spine.
  2. Your hands can be flat outside of your feet, on your outer legs, or on blocks.

Chaturanga Dandasana (Half-Plank Position)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, either step back to Plank Pose and lower halfway or jump directly into Chaturanga, outlined below.
  2. Align your wrists under your elbows and bend your elbows halfway, or as low as you can while maintaining a neutral spine, hovering off the floor.
  3. Keep your feet and legs hip-width apart.
  4. Lift your belly and keep the back of your neck long.

Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (Upward-Facing Dog)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, roll over the tops of your toes so you’re pressing into the tops of your feet. Press your arms toward straight.
  2. Keep your thighs lifting away from the floor as your tailbone reaches toward your heels. Ensure your abs are engaged.

Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, uncurl your toes back to a flat-footed position, lift your thighs and hips up, and straighten your knees.
  2. Make sure your arms are straight and firm.
  3. Look between your feet and hold for 5 breaths.

Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend)

Directions:

(Video) {How To} Sun Salutations A, B, & C Flow Sequences

  1. On an exhale, step forward or jump to land with your feet between your hands.
  2. On an inhale, reach your chest forward and lift your torso halfway up, with a long spine.
  3. Your hands can be flat outside of your feet, on your outer legs, or on blocks.

Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, bring your arms down and fold forward at your hips.
  2. Place your hands by your feet or outer shins or on blocks.
  3. Hang your head freely.

Utthita Hastasana in Tadasana (Arms Extended in Mountain Pose)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, lift your body, reaching your arms up and in line with your ears.
  2. Some lineages add a slight backbend at the top of this movement.

Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose)

Directions:

  1. Stand at the top of your mat with your arms by your sides. Your feet can be together or hip-width apart.
  2. Align your ankles, knees, and shoulders so your body is symmetrical.
  3. With your arms by your sides, turn your upper arm bones to face each other with your palms forward, opening your chest.
  4. Keep your chin parallel to the floor.

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Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose)

Directions:

  1. Stand at the top of your mat with your arms by your sides. Your feet can be together or hip-width apart.
  2. Align your ankles, knees, and shoulders so your body is symmetrical.
  3. With your arms by your sides, turn your upper arm bones to face each other with your palms forward, opening your chest.
  4. Keep your chin parallel to the floor.

Utkatasana (Chair Pose)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, bend your knees, sit your bum back, and reach your straight arms up toward the sky, coming into Chair Pose.
  2. Maintain a long neutral spine.
  3. If this is taxing for your neck or shoulders, lower your arms to where you can release any tension in your neck and keep your shoulders down.

Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, straighten your legs; bring your arms down, reaching wide; and fold forward at your hips.
  2. Place your hands by your feet or outer shins or on blocks.
  3. Hang your head freely.

Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, reach your chest forward and lift your torso halfway up, with a long spine.
  2. Your hands can be flat outside of your feet, on your outer legs, or on blocks.

Chaturanga Dandasana (Half-Plank Position)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, either step back to Plank Pose and lower halfway or jump directly into Chaturanga, outlined below.
  2. Align your wrists under your elbows and bend your elbows halfway, or as low as you can while maintaining a neutral spine, hovering off the floor.
  3. Keep your feet and legs hip-width apart.
  4. Lift your belly and keep the back of your neck long.

Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (Upward-Facing Dog)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, roll over the tops of your toes so you’re pressing into the tops of your feet. Press your arms toward straight.
  2. Keep your thighs lifting away from the floor as your tailbone reaches toward your heels. Ensure your abs are engaged.

Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, uncurl your toes back to a flat-footed position, lift your thighs and hips up, and straighten your knees.
  2. Make sure your arms are straight and firm.
  3. Look between your feet and hold for 5 breaths.

Virabhadrasana 1 (Warrior 1), right side

Directions:

  1. Step your RIGHT foot forward between your hands and spin your back foot flat, so your toes are turned out to the side and the arch of your back foot is in line with the heel of your front foot.
  2. Bend your front knee and, on an inhale, lift your pelvis and torso upright, opening your chest to the side.
  3. Bring your arms straight in line with your shoulders, reaching them long and straight. Or bring your palms to touch in the center of your chest.

Chaturanga Dandasana (Half-Plank Position)

Directions:

  1. As you exhale, bring your hands to the floor on either side of your front foot, step back into Plank, and start to lower toward Chaturanga.
  2. Align your wrists under your elbows and bend your elbows halfway, or as low as you can while maintaining a neutral spine, hovering off the floor.
  3. Keep your feet and legs hip-width apart.
  4. Lift your belly and keep the back of your neck long.

Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (Upward-Facing Dog)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, roll over the tops of your toes so you’re pressing into the tops of your feet. Press your arms toward straight.
  2. Keep your thighs lifting away from the floor as your tailbone reaches toward your heels. Ensure your abs are engaged.

Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, uncurl your toes back to a flat-footed position, lift your thighs and hips up, and straighten your knees.
  2. Make sure your arms are straight and firm.
  3. Look between your feet and hold for 5 breaths.

Virabhadrasana 1 (Warrior 1), left side

Directions:

  1. Step your LEFT foot forward between your hands and spin your back foot flat, so your toes are turned out to the side and the arch of your back foot is in line with the heel of your front foot.
  2. Bend your front knee and, on an inhale, lift your pelvis and torso upright, opening your chest to the side.
  3. Bring your arms straight in line with your shoulders, reaching them long and straight. Or bring your palms to touch in the center of your chest.

Chaturanga Dandasana (Half-Plank Position)

Directions:

  1. As you exhale, bring your hands to the floor on either side of your front foot, step back into Plank, and start to lower toward Chaturanga.
  2. Align your wrists under your elbows and bend your elbows halfway, or as low as you can while maintaining a neutral spine, hovering off the floor.
  3. Keep your feet and legs hip-width apart.
  4. Lift your belly and keep the back of your neck long.

Urdhva Mukha Svanasana (Upward-Facing Dog)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, roll over the tops of your toes so you’re pressing into the tops of your feet. Press your arms toward straight.
  2. Keep your thighs lifting away from the floor as your tailbone reaches toward your heels. Ensure your abs are engaged.

Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, uncurl your toes back to a flat-footed position, lift your thighs and hips up, and straighten your knees.
  2. Make sure your arms are straight and firm.
  3. Look between your feet and hold for 5 breaths.

Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend)

Directions:

(Video) Guide to Sun Salutations A, B, & C

  1. Step or hop to the top of your mat.
  2. On an inhale, reach your chest forward and lift your torso halfway up, with a long spine.
  3. Your hands can be flat outside of your feet, on your outer legs, or on blocks.

Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, bring your arms down, reaching wide, and fold forward at your hips.
  2. Place your hands by your feet or outer shins or on blocks.
  3. Hang your head freely.

Utkatasana (Chair Pose)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, bend your knees, sit your bum back, and reach your straight arms up toward the sky, coming into Chair Pose.
  2. Maintain a long neutral spine.
  3. If this is taxing for your neck or shoulders, lower your arms to where you can release any tension in your neck and keep your shoulders down.

Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose)

  1. Stand at the top of your mat with your arms by your sides. Your feet can be together or hip-width apart.
  2. Align your ankles, knees, and shoulders so your body is symmetrical.
  3. With your arms by your sides, turn your upper arm bones to face each other with your palms forward, opening your chest.
  4. Keep your chin parallel to the floor.

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Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose)

Directions:

  1. Stand at the top of your mat with your arms by your sides. Your feet can be together or hip-width apart.
  2. Align your ankles, knees, and shoulders so your body is symmetrical.
  3. With your arms by your sides, turn your upper arm bones to face each other with your palms forward, opening your chest.
  4. Keep your chin parallel to the floor.

Utthita Hastasana in Tadasana (Arms Extended in Mountain Pose)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, reach your arms up and in line with your ears.
  2. Add a slight backbend at the top of this movement by taking your arms farther back and looking up to the sky.

Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, bring your arms down, reaching wide, and fold forward at your hips.
  2. Place your hands by your feet or outer shins or on blocks.
  3. Hang your head freely.

Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, reach your chest forward and lift your torso halfway up, with a long spine.
  2. Your hands can be flat outside of your feet, on your outer legs, or on blocks.

Anjanayasana (Low Lunge Pose), right side

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, step your LEFT foot back and lower your LEFT knee to the floor, keeping your front knee bent.
  2. As you inhale, lift your torso upright with your arms in line with your ears, reaching up.

Plank Pose to transition

Directions:

  1. Place your hands on either side of your front foot.
  2. Lift your back knee and step back to Plank Pose.

Knees-Chest-Chin to transition

Directions:

  1. From Plank Pose, exhale to lower your knees, chest, and chin (in that order) toward the floor.
  2. Your bum will still be in the air initially.
  3. Press your chest through your arms and lengthen your spine all the way down to the floor.

Bhujangasana (Cobra Pose)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, press your arms toward straight with your hips and thighs remaining on the floor. You’ll be in a backbend.
  2. Pull your belly in and keep your legs strong.
  3. Align your wrists and elbows.

Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, uncurl your toes, stepping back to a flat-footed position. Lift your thighs and hips up and straighten your knees. Press your hips back over your feet.
  2. Make sure your arms are straight and firm.
  3. Look between your feet and hold for 5 breaths.

Anjanayasana (Low Lunge Pose), left side

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, step your LEFT foot between your hands and lower your RIGHT knee to the floor.
  2. Bend your front knee.
  3. As you inhale, lift your torso upright with your arms in line with your ears.

Plank Pose to transition

Directions:

  1. Place your hands on either side of your front foot.
  2. Lift your back knee and step back to Plank Pose.

Knees-Chest-Chin

Directions:

  1. From Plank Pose, exhale to lower your knees, chest, and chin (in that order) toward the floor.
  2. Your bum will still be in the air initially.
  3. Press your chest through your arms and lengthen the spine all the way down.

Bhujangasana (Cobra Pose)

Directions:

  1. On an inhale, press your arms toward straight with your hips and thighs remaining on the floor. You’ll be in a backbend.
  2. Pull your belly in and keep your legs strong.
  3. Align your wrists and elbows.

Adho Mukha Svanasana (Downward-Facing Dog)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, curl your toes back under and lift your thighs and hips up and back to Downward-Facing Dog.
  2. Make your arms straight and firm.
  3. Look between your feet and hold for 5 breaths.

Ardha Uttanasana (Half Forward Bend)

Directions:

  1. Step or jump forward on an exhale.
  2. On an inhale, reach your chest forward and lift your torso halfway up, with a long spine.
  3. Your hands can be flat outside of your feet, on your outer legs, or on blocks.

Uttanasana (Standing Forward Bend)

Directions:

  1. On an exhale, take your arms wide and fold forward at your hips.
  2. Place your hands by your feet or outer shins or on blocks.
  3. Hang your head freely.

Utthita Hastasana in Tadasana (Arms Extended in Mountain Pose)

Directions:

(Video) Lesson 24 Sun salutations Surya Namaskara A, B and C sequences #suryanamaskar

  1. On an inhale, reach your arms out to the sides and rise to standing.
  2. Lean back to open your chest more.

Tadasana (Standing Mountain Pose)

Directions:

  1. Stand at the top of your mat, with your arms by your sides. Your feet can be together or hip-width apart.
  2. Align your ankles, knees, and shoulders so your body is symmetrical.
  3. With your arms by your sides, turn your upper arm bones to face each other with your palms forward, opening your chest.
  4. Keep your chin parallel to the floor.

In addition to yoga’s plethora of general benefits, Sun Salutations have some unique advantages all their own.

Sun Salutations improve mobility of your entire body

In 2019, a study looking at the kinematics (the study of objects in motion) of Sun Salutations found that the alternating movements in the series increased mobility in most of the body’s joints (3).

Sun Salutations connect you to your breath

Sun Salutations are breath-based sequences, meaning that each movement within the series is traditionally performed in coordination with your breath.

Sun Salutations are ritualistic

These powerful sequences are rooted in deep breathing and often considered a moving meditation.

Sun Salutations offer cardiovascular benefits

In addition to the study mentioned earlier, another 2021 study found that just 10 minutes of Sun Salutations — which the researchers classified as “high intensity Hatha yoga” — was enough to raise participants’ heart rate (4).

This is promising for people who don’t often have time for a long workout.

Sun Salutations are accessible

You can intensify or pare down these sequences, depending on what you prefer to do on any particular day.

Sun Salutations reduce stress

A recent study found that the Sun Salutations had a much more significant impact on practitioners’ anxiety and stress levels than aerobic exercise did (5).

Because Surya Namaskara A and B are dedicated to the sun, they can be nice to practice first thing in the morning. You may notice that many studios and practitioners face east because it’s the direction of the sunrise.

Even so, you can perform Sun Salutations at any time of day, particularly given which sequence you choose to do.

In certain yoga lineages, the third common Sun Salutation sequence, Surya Namaskara C, is sometimes called Chandra Namaskara, meaning “Moon Salute,” and is performed in the late afternoon or evening.

The beauty of the Sun Salutations is that they are their own form of warmup. Some lineages, such as the Ashtanga method, start every class in Tadasana and go directly into the sequence. Other lower intensity classes may spend the entire class building up to one round.

Depending on how much time you spend being active during the day, you may want to consider a light warmup beforehand.

(Video) Sun Salutation A and B - Intermediate 1 - 20 Minutes

For example, you can come into a tabletop position first to warm up your wrists or hold a longer Downward Dog in the beginning while you pedal your legs and let your body settle.

Surya Namaskara A typically consists of 9 poses. It generally precedes Surya Namaskara B.

Surya Namaskara B is a 17-pose sequence. It tends to be more rigorous and is often taught in higher intensity classes. It generally comes after the A series.

Surya Namaskara C differs from lineage to lineage. For example, in the teacher Satchidananda’s lineage, Integral Yoga, the postures that make up the C flow are similar to poses that make up the Chandra Namaskar, or the Moon Salutation Flow, in other lineages.

In other Vinyasa styles, such as the YogaWorks method, some teachers will call beginner’s Sun Salutations Surya Namaskara C. These are Sun Salutations that are broken down and include a lot of modifications.

Sun Salutation C is a bit of a wild card in that it can be done in anticipation of Sun Salutation A, later in the sequence, or as a stand-alone sequence.

If you have tight hamstrings, try this:

  • Bend your knees in any pose where you’re folded down toward the floor, like Downward-Facing Dog, Uttanasana, or Ardha Uttanasana.

If you need to build core strength, try this:

  • Put your knees down for Chaturanga or Plank Pose.

If you have lower back pain or tightness, try this:

  • In poses where you are folded and your legs are straight, consider bending your knees.
  • Avoid Upward-Facing Dog and stick to Cobra Pose.

If you have tight shoulders, try this:

  • Any time your arms are overhead and in line with your ears (Utthita Hastasana, Downward-Facing Dog, Utkatasana, Warrior 1, Low Lunge), take your arms wider than shoulder width into more of a V-shaped position.
  • In Downward-Facing Dog, you can turn your hands and arm bones out to exaggerate external rotation of your shoulder joint, which helps keep your neck spacious.

If you have neck pain, try this:

  • Don’t worry about looking up whenever you lift your arms (as in Chair Pose, Warrior 1, or Low Lunge). Look straight ahead instead.
  • In Chaturanga, try shifting forward before lowering, which prevents your neck from collapsing.

  • Remember, these are breath-based flows, meaning that traditionally there is half a breath or 1 full breath per movement. If you are unable to do this cadence, try lengthening your hold of the posture rather than rushing your breathing.
  • Modifications do not necessarily make the poses easier. Modifying a pose is not cheating or taking the easy route. Variations and modifications are excellent ways to learn how to engage the proper muscles and move from the right muscles.
  • Though this is a dynamic sequence that moves fairly quickly, there’s no need to rush. Feel free to take extra breaths in poses or hold poses for as long as they feel good to you.

The bottom line

(Video) Surya Namaskar (Sun Salutation) A, C, and B

The Sun Salutations are well-rounded movement sequences that help you connect to your breath and body. They are dynamic, which means they can also be a whole lot of fun!

While they have historic roots, you can spice them up in many ways and adapt them to how you feel on any given day.

FAQs

How do you sequence a Sun Salutation? ›

How to Perform a Traditional Sun Salutation Sequence
  1. Start in mountain pose (Tadasana). ...
  2. Move into prayer pose (Pranamasana). ...
  3. Enter raised arms pose (Hasta Uttanasana). ...
  4. Lower into standing forward bend (Uttanasana). ...
  5. Come into equestrian pose (Ashwa Sanchalanasana). ...
  6. Move into low plank pose (Chaturanga Dandasana).
21 Sept 2021

What are 12 steps of Sun Salutations? ›

12 Poses Of Surya Namaskar
  1. Pose 1: Prayer pose – Pranamasana.
  2. Pose 2: Raised arms pose – Hasta Uttanasana.
  3. Pose 3: Hand to foot pose – Hasta Padasana.
  4. Pose 4: Equestrian pose – Ashwa Sanchalanasana.
  5. Pose 5: Mountain pose – Parvatasana.
  6. Pose 6: Ashtanga Namaskara.
  7. Pose 7: Cobra pose – Bhujangasana.
15 Apr 2022

How many Sun Salutation sequences are there? ›

A Sun Salutation, also known as Surya Namaskar, is a traditional yoga practice that in today's modern culture is made up of 12 poses that are linked together to form a flow.

How many rounds of sun salutation A and B are completed in Ashtanga yoga? ›

Although these sequences are used in many other styles of yoga as well, in the Ashtanga primary series, each practice starts with five rounds of surya namaskar A followed by five rounds of surya namaskar B.

Do you do Sun Salutation A and B? ›

Yogis should master sun salutation A before moving on to B.

How long should sun salutation B take? ›

Practise Sun Salutation B in class:

All levels with Esther Ekhart: 3 Sun Salutations S / 3 Sun Salutations B – 10 mins, Vinyasa Flow.

What are the 108 Sun Salutations? ›

Yogis are known to practice 108 sun salutations during the change of seasons. Practicing 108 Sun Salutations is a meditative practice that connects the body, the mind, and the universe specifically when nature is undergoing a change.

Can I do 108 Sun Salutations daily? ›

As a general rule, you can do 108 sun salutations daily. However, keep in mind that it is a physically challenging practice, and you may want to take some rest every other day. Consider mixing it up with more grounding practices so as to prevent any injury from the repetitive movements.

How many poses are there in sun salutation B? ›

Sun Salutation B features 19 poses that offer a full-body stretch that opens the heart, shoulders, hips, back, and chest, and a cardiovascular workout.

How many poses are in Sun Salutation A vs sun salutation B? ›

"The Ashtanga school of yoga has two versions of the Sun Salutation - version A and B. While the first one has about 9 postures, the second version constitutes of 14 asanas.

Is there a sun salutation C? ›

Sun Salutation C (also known as Surya Namaskar C) is a variation on the traditional 12-posture sequence of flowing movements. This alternative offers an entire body stretch, counterbalancing bending of the spine, and an opening of the heart, shoulders, hips, back, and chest.

What is included in Sun Salutation A? ›

Here is a guide to practicing Sun Salutation A:
  • Start in mountain pose (Tadasana). ...
  • Move into upward salute (Urdhva Hastasana). ...
  • Bend into standing forward fold (Uttanasana). ...
  • Lift into half-standing forward fold (Ardha Uttanasana). ...
  • Step into low plank pose (Chaturanga Dandasana).
21 Sept 2021

Is 3 rounds of Surya Namaskar enough? ›

Try and meditate before and after the routine to calm your mind, and improve your mental health. Research suggests that each round of surya namaskar burns close to 13.90 calories, and the ideal number of reps is 12. Of course, start small and then go up to 12 surya namaskars that will help you burn 416 calories.

How many rounds of surya namaskar A and B? ›

Five rounds of Surya Namaskar A come first, then the flow intensifies with five rounds of Surya Namaskar B to further warm up your body. In the traditional Ashtanga method, each breath is accompanied by a movement, making for a fairly brisk pace.

Is Sun Salutation A complete exercise? ›

Thus sun salutation becomes a kind of activity which involves almost every part of the body and is considered as a complete exercise. Many of sun salutation practitioners also believe that regular practice of few cycles, when performed properly leads to development and strengthening of almost every part of the body.

What happens if you do Sun Salutations everyday? ›

A continuous practice of Sun Salutations will bring more strength, flexibility, and tone to the body. It will open the hamstrings, shoulders, and the chest, as well as release tension. As you move through the poses, you are also lubricating the joints, in turn aiding in keeping the full range of motion in the body.

How many full breaths are in sun salutation A? ›

Exhale, draw the belly in and up and press back into Downward Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana). Ground your hands and feet into the floor, press the tops of the thighs back and extend the whole spine. Take three long, deep breaths… 9.

Who should not do Sun Salutation? ›

High Blood Pressure: People suffering with high blood pressure should avoid this sequence. But with proper guidance from a yoga teacher and for someone not elderly can begin this yoga pose slowly and carefully.

Does Sun Salutation reduce belly fat? ›

Yes, Surya Namaskar helps reduce belly fat, bloating and tones muscles. If practised alongside a proper diet, it can help to lose weight around the belly. Yes, Surya Namaskar helps reduce belly fat, bloating and tones muscles. If practised alongside a proper diet, it can help to lose weight around the belly.

Do you need to warm up before Sun Salutation? ›

Sun Salutations Are Often Too Intense to Use as a Warm-Up

These poses ask a lot of the body. And in my opinion, they're too intense to jump right into at the beginning of a practice. In preparation for bigger postures and sequences the body can benefit from warming up with smaller, less intense movements.

Why do Sun Salutations burn so many calories? ›

What is this? They provide a great cardio workout. Depending on the pace you do your sun salutations, they can really increase the heart rate and give you a good cardio session. The quicker your pace, the more you are challenging yourself, burning calories, and targeting fat loss.

How long does it take to do 100 sun salutations? ›

This practice can take anywhere from 50 minutes to several hours, depending on your pace and how often you take breaks. If you're interested in trying it out, here are a few tips to get you through your first 108 Sun Salutations practice!

How hard is 108 Sun Salutations? ›

108 Sun Salutations in a row can be tough, mentally and physically (no kidding!) and is probably the closest we are going to get to doing a marathon in yoga. So we have created a training plan for you to follow to get you prepared; building up your strength gradually so that you can practice the full 108 safely.

Why is 108 a sacred number? ›

According to Vedic cosmology, 108 is the basis of creation, represents the universe and all our existence. In Hinduism, we believe that outer cosmology should mirror our inner spirituality because our ultimate realization is that we are one in the same.

What happens if I do 50 Surya Namaskar everyday? ›

Surya Namaskar, also known as 'The Ultimate Asana', strengthens your back as well as your muscles and brings down blood sugar levels. It also improves metabolism and blood circulation (hence, a glowing skin) and ensures regular menstrual cycle for women.

What will happen if I do 30 Surya Namaskar daily? ›

30 minutes of Surya Namaskar can help burn 416 calories, whereas running around 414 calories, weightlifting burns around 199 calories, tennis around 232 calories, rock climbing around 364 calories, and football around 298 calories.

What happens if you do 12 Surya Namaskar everyday? ›

Physical and mental health

The Surya Namaskar tones the entire body, helps with weight loss, and strengthens muscles and joints. Practice this flow if you want to improve your complexion as it ensures a better functioning digestive system. Improve your sleep as it helps combat insomnia and reduces stress levels.

What poses are added to sun salutation B? ›

Unlike in Surya Namaskar A, where there are 12 steps, Sun Salutation B has 19 steps with the addition of Utkatasana (Chair Pose) and Warrior I poses.

How many rounds is 108 Sun Salutations? ›

The number 108 is a very important number in many religions. For Sun salutations 108 is often broken into 9 rounds of 12 salutations or 12 rounds of 9. Either way you wish to break it down one may need markers to keep count for oneself and for motivation for participants.

Are all Sun Salutations the same? ›

There are many variations, with some versions leaving out poses like the goddess squat and star pose and adding in downward-facing dog—but here's how a typical moon salutation goes: Inhale and start in standing mountain pose.

Are 6 Sun Salutations enough? ›

How many Sun Salutation repetitions should you do? Some yogis suggest at last six repetitions, others twelve, but you will find the magic number for your own practice. Even just a few Surya Namaskaras every day allows your body to move more freely with greater strength, stamina, and flexibility than without them.

How many Sun Salutations do you need for New Years? ›

The Sun Salutations are used here as a moving meditation so we practice 108, or the number we feel is appropriate for us, to help us concentrate and focus on our mantra for the new year. This is a way for you to bring in the new year with a positive outlook and a focus on mindfulness.

What muscles do you use sun salutation A? ›

From your achilles, this pose stretches the calf muscles, then your hamstrings, followed by the muscles into your backside. The stretch can also be felt into your lower back, the muscles that run all the way up your spine (erector spinae) and your lat muscles.

What is 12 set of Surya Namaskar? ›

Each set of Surya Namaskar has 12 asanas. So, when you repeat it 12 times from both sides, you are doing 288 poses. What can be better than this when you can do 288 asanas in just 20 minutes. Doing one round of Surya Namaskar burns approximately 13.90 calories.

How many full breaths are in Sun Salutation A? ›

Exhale, draw the belly in and up and press back into Downward Dog (Adho Mukha Svanasana). Ground your hands and feet into the floor, press the tops of the thighs back and extend the whole spine. Take three long, deep breaths… 9.

Why is there 12 steps in Surya Namaskar? ›

The Surya Namaskar's design with the twelve postures can help the twelve sun cycles become in sync with your physical cycles. The solar plexus is the central point of the human body.

What is 75 crore Surya Namaskar? ›

750,000,000 Rounds of Suryanamaskar challange

Execute Total 75 Crore (750,000,000) rounds of suryanamaskar all over the world. Practice Suryanamaskar for Minimum 21 days, minimum 13 rounds of Suryanamaskar in one day which takes maximum 15 minutes.

How long does it take to do 100 Sun Salutations? ›

This practice can take anywhere from 50 minutes to several hours, depending on your pace and how often you take breaks. If you're interested in trying it out, here are a few tips to get you through your first 108 Sun Salutations practice!

Do Sun Salutations count as cardio? ›

Sun salutations are also a very good cardiovascular exercise, helping to increase the metabolic rate of the body, and in turn aiding in weight loss. Those who are from the Hatha Yoga school know that it is an essential part of the asana practice.

Do you need to warm-up before Sun Salutation? ›

Sun Salutations Are Often Too Intense to Use as a Warm-Up

These poses ask a lot of the body. And in my opinion, they're too intense to jump right into at the beginning of a practice. In preparation for bigger postures and sequences the body can benefit from warming up with smaller, less intense movements.

Is 12 Surya Namaskar enough? ›

According to Femina India, one set of Surya Namaskar burns around 13.90 calories. So, 12 sets of Surya Namaskar will help you lose around 416 calories over time. To know how it helps and how to do it, check out the rest of the article!

What are the 12 names of Lord Surya? ›

The Sun is known in Hindu mythology by twelve names: Mitra, Ravi, Surya, Bhanu, Kha, Pusha, Hiranyagarbha, Marichin, Aditya, Savitr, Arka and Bhaskara.

How many steps is 10 Surya Namaskar? ›

There are 12 steps in one Surya Namaskar round.

What are 3 benefits of Sun Salutations? ›

The powerful benefits of daily Sun Salutations
  • Become centered and grounded. ...
  • Create focus for your day. ...
  • Gain muscle and flexibility. ...
  • Leave your ego behind. ...
  • Boost the immune system and overall health. ...
  • De-stress and find inner peace.
19 Mar 2020

Does Sun Salutation balance chakras? ›

Benefits of Surya Namaskar or Sun Salutation

It is said that your body has several chakras through which life energy or prana is channelized to nourish you with good health. Practicing Surya Namaskar activates these chakras, enhances the size of it, letting prana flow through freely.

Videos

1. Ashtanga Yoga: Surya Namaskara A and B with David Garrigues
(Asana Kitchen with David Garrigues)
2. Sun Salutation A + B | Beginners Guide
(Yoga With Louis)
3. How To Do A Sun Salutation | The Right Way | Well+Good
(Well+Good)
4. Sun Salutation A, B and C (traditional)
(Matea Yoga)
5. Traditional Sun Salutations Yoga Flow | Classic Surya Namaskar A B C | 5 Minutes
(YOGA UPLOAD with Maris Aylward)
6. Day 10 - 10 min Sun Salutation Practice -30 Days of Yoga
(Yoga With Adriene)
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